Instruction By Design: Discussing Discussion Boards

Instruction by Design Podcast

In this episode, the instructional designers from Academic Innovation (Jinnette Senecal, Celia Coochwytewa, Aaron Kraft, and Steven Crawford) reflect on the purpose and role of asynchronous online discussion activities, discuss how to develop an effective discussion prompt/question in alignment with course objectives, and describe at least one strategy for maximizing the administrative efficiency of online discussions. Continue reading

ASU Faculty Showcases Innovative Teaching

Faculty, instructors, graduate students, and staff from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) recently met for the 3rd CLAS Demofest to showcase innovative teaching practices across diverse content areas. For this semester’s event, eight presenters from seven different departments and schools in CLAS shared and discussed their teaching, spanning a variety of course formats (face-to-face, blended, online) and different student enrollment (large lecture courses, small undergraduate and graduate seminars, etc.). Continue reading

To Get the Right Answer, You Have to Ask the Right Question

We want our students to develop those higher order thinking skills that are so crucial to developing those much talked about 21st Century Skills including the ability to think critically, synthesize, and evaluate. The development of these skills is essential for students to complete their degree programs, and enable them as citizens to be able to solve the complex problems facing our society in the future.

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Setting the Stage for Meaningful Peer-to-Peer Feedback

Although many instructors integrate group-based or team-based learning activities into their teaching (see TeachOnline post on The Value of Group Work), getting students to actually provide meaningful peer-to-peer feedback can be challenging. Too often, cultural norms or fears of potential social backlash make students veer away from critiquing each other in a group setting or an online discussion forum. As a result, peers often do not know how to provide meaningful feedback and tend to fall back on statements, such as “I agree with what s/he said!” or the infamous Facebook-popularized, “I like it!”

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Group Discussion Boards

Dr. Nancy Jurik wanted to encourage thoughtful reflection on course readings and discussions in her Justice Theory course. To do this, she sliced her 40+ student course into four groups of 10 asking them to post twice a week. The first post was to respond to an instructor question based upon the readings and narrated PowerPoint lectures; the second post was to summarize the key areas of agreement or disagreement among the students who responded to post one. Obviously, trying to summarize 40 student responses would be a monumental task, however, in groups of 10, it was very manageable.